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Rustic Eats | Easy Pavlova Recipe & Video
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Rustic Eats | Easy Pavlova Recipe & Video

Did you try Pavlova during one of our student travel programs in Australia?  It’s delicious, and we highly recommend you give it a try! Pavlova is a cake-shaped meringue topped with whipped cream, kiwis, berries, or other summer fruits. It’s named after Russian ballerina, Anna Pavlova, and is said to have originated in Australia. That would make sense since it’s such a popular dessert there. However, New Zealanders claim that it originated in New Zealand. All we know is, if we had invented such a tasty dessert, we’d try to get credit too!

Regardless of its origins, this airy, light, and crunchy meringue is a perfect treat all year round. Here are the ingredients and steps for Pavlova, or watch our video below.

Ingredients

• 4 egg whites

• 1 1/4 cups white sugar

• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

• 1 teaspoon lemon juice

• 2 teaspoons cornstarch

• 1 pint heavy cream

• 6 kiwi, peeled and sliced

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Line a 21”x15” baking sheet with parchment paper. Draw a 9-inch circle in diameter on the parchment paper.

2. In a large bowl, beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Gradually add in the sugar, about 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat until thick and glossy. Gently fold in vanilla extract, lemon juice, and cornstarch.

3. Spoon mixture inside the circle drawn on the parchment paper. Working from the center, spread mixture toward the outside edge, building edge slightly. This should leave a slight depression in the center.

4. Bake for 1 hour. Cool on a wire rack.

5. In a small bowl, beat heavy cream until stiff peaks form; set aside. Remove the paper, and place meringue on a flat serving plate. Fill the center of the meringue with whipped cream, and top with kiwifruit slices. Along with traditional kiwi, you won’t regret adding strawberry, mango, pineapple, or any mixed berries.

 

About the Author

Janette Daneshmand